Conservative Christian organizations are getting impatient with Trump

by DAVID CRARY and RACHEL ZOLL, | AP National Writers  |  published on February 17, 2017

FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 14, 2016 file photo, East Los Angeles high school students protest against the election of President-elect Donald Trump outside Los Angeles City Hall. Mixed signals from the White House on gay rights and conscience protections have put two constituencies on edge: LGBT advocates already wary of President Donald Trump and religious conservatives determined to hold him to his campaign promises. (AP Photo/Nick Ut)

NEW YORK (AP) — Mixed signals from the White House on gay rights and religious exemptions have put two constituencies on edge: LGBT advocates already wary of President Donald Trump and social conservatives determined to hold him to his campaign promises.

Recent developments have left both groups anxious and uncertain.

Last week, Trump pledged to maintain President Barack Obama‘s job protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender federal employees, and the White House touted him as a protector of the broader LGBT community.

Soon after, Trump nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court, which cheered conservatives because of the nominee’s past support for broad religious exemptions. Then a draft executive order on religious exemptions was leaked; among other things, it would have boosted protections for those with faith objections to gay marriage while undercutting LGBT gains made under Obama.